Soledad Brother: The Prison Letters of George Jackson (1970)
Introduction: George Jackson was acclaimed throughout the world as the most powerful and eloquent Black writer since Malcolm X. He became a symbol for the struggle of all oppressed people. The example of his extraordinary courage, integrity and humanity made him a hero to Blacks and whites alike.
"The power of George Jackson’s personal story remains painfully relevant to our nation today, with its persistent racism, its hellish prisons, its unjust judicial system, and the poles of wealth and poverty that are at the root of all that. I hope the younger generation, black and white, will read Soledad Brother." - Howard Zinn
"[George Jackson was] a talented writer, a sensitive man, a potantial leader and political thinker of great persuasiveness." -Tim Wicker
"Jackson emerges from obscurity transformed from a precipitous, despair-ridden adolescent into a man of knowledge, passion, and control, into a demon energy of absolute commitment, into a terrible prophet." -The Washington Monthly
"When Soledad Brother was first published, many people sensed in George Jackson the successor to Malcolm X … . it showed Jackson, like Malcolm, developing a theory and eloquently expressing a vision of the path to African American freedom through the unity of the peoples oppressed by imperialism. This makes the book extremely dangerous - and therefore, as the author must have known (see his June 4, 1970 letter to Angela Davis), potentially his own death warrant. Though George Jackson was murdered ten months after the book was published, Soledad Brother remains a menace to the powers that killed him." -H. Bruce Franklin
"… a penetrating and scathing indictment of capitalist American life." -Ebony

Soledad Brother: The Prison Letters of George Jackson (1970)

Introduction: George Jackson was acclaimed throughout the world as the most powerful and eloquent Black writer since Malcolm X. He became a symbol for the struggle of all oppressed people. The example of his extraordinary courage, integrity and humanity made him a hero to Blacks and whites alike.

"The power of George Jackson’s personal story remains painfully relevant to our nation today, with its persistent racism, its hellish prisons, its unjust judicial system, and the poles of wealth and poverty that are at the root of all that. I hope the younger generation, black and white, will read Soledad Brother." - Howard Zinn

"[George Jackson was] a talented writer, a sensitive man, a potantial leader and political thinker of great persuasiveness." -Tim Wicker

"Jackson emerges from obscurity transformed from a precipitous, despair-ridden adolescent into a man of knowledge, passion, and control, into a demon energy of absolute commitment, into a terrible prophet." -The Washington Monthly

"When Soledad Brother was first published, many people sensed in George Jackson the successor to Malcolm X … . it showed Jackson, like Malcolm, developing a theory and eloquently expressing a vision of the path to African American freedom through the unity of the peoples oppressed by imperialism. This makes the book extremely dangerous - and therefore, as the author must have known (see his June 4, 1970 letter to Angela Davis), potentially his own death warrant. Though George Jackson was murdered ten months after the book was published, Soledad Brother remains a menace to the powers that killed him." -H. Bruce Franklin

"… a penetrating and scathing indictment of capitalist American life." -Ebony

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